Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 1 al 10 de 15
  1. #1
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de sujal
    Fecha de ingreso
    marzo-2006
    Ubicación
    Guadalajara
    Mensajes
    8.690

    Diabetes y alimentación veg*ana


    Curr Diab Rep. 2010 Apr;10(2):152-8.
    Usefulness of vegetarian and vegan diets for treating type 2 diabetes.
    Trapp CB, Barnard ND.

    Abstract
    Significant benefits for diabetes prevention and management have been observed with vegetarian and especially vegan diets. This article reviews observational studies and intervention trials on such diets, and discusses their efficacy, nutritional adequacy, acceptability, and sustainability. Research to date has demonstrated that a low-fat, plant-based nutritional approach improves control of weight, glycemia, and cardiovascular risk. These studies have also shown that carefully planned vegan diets can be more nutritious than diets based on more conventional diet guidelines, with an acceptability that is comparable with that of other therapeutic regimens. Current intervention guidelines from professional organizations offer support for this approach. Vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages in managing type 2 diabetes that merit the attention of individuals with diabetes and their caregivers.

    (Pendiente de conclusiones)
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20425575


    2009 May;89(5):1588S-1596S. Epub 2009 Apr 1.
    A low-fat vegan diet and a conventional diabetes diet in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled, 74-wk clinical trial.
    Barnard ND, Cohen J, Jenkins DJ, Turner-McGrievy G, Gloede L, Green A, Ferdowsian H.

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Low-fat vegetarian and vegan diets are associated with weight loss, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cardiovascular health. OBJECTIVE: We compared the effects of a low-fat vegan diet and conventional diabetes diet recommendations on glycemia, weight, and plasma lipids.
    DESIGN: Free-living individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to a low-fat vegan diet (n = 49) or a diet following 2003 American Diabetes Association guidelines (conventional, n = 50) for 74 wk. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb A(1c)) and plasma lipids were assessed at weeks 0, 11, 22, 35, 48, 61, and 74. Weight was measured at weeks 0, 22, and 74.
    RESULTS: Weight loss was significant within each diet group but not significantly different between groups (-4.4 kg in the vegan group and -3.0 kg in the conventional diet group, P = 0.25) and related significantly to Hb A(1c) changes (r = 0.50, P = 0.001). Hb A(1c) changes from baseline to 74 wk or last available values were -0.34 and -0.14 for vegan and conventional diets, respectively (P = 0.43). Hb A(1c) changes from baseline to last available value or last value before any medication adjustment were -0.40 and 0.01 for vegan and conventional diets, respectively (P = 0.03). In analyses before alterations in lipid-lowering medications, total cholesterol decreased by 20.4 and 6.8 mg/dL in the vegan and conventional diet groups, respectively (P = 0.01); LDL cholesterol decreased by 13.5 and 3.4 mg/dL in the vegan and conventional groups, respectively (P = 0.03).
    CONCLUSIONS: Both diets were associated with sustained reductions in weight and plasma lipid concentrations. In an analysis controlling for medication changes, a low-fat vegan diet appeared to improve glycemia and plasma lipids more than did conventional diabetes diet recommendations. Whether the observed differences provide clinical benefit for the macro- or microvascular complications of diabetes remains to be established.
    una dieta vegana de pocas calorías pareció mejorar la glycemia y lípidos plasma más que hicieron recomendaciones de dieta de diabetes convencionales.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19339401


    J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb;109(2):263-72.
    A low-fat vegan diet elicits greater macronutrient changes, but is comparable in adherence and acceptability, compared with a more conventional diabetes diet among individuals with type 2 diabetes.
    Barnard ND, Gloede L, Cohen J, Jenkins DJ, Turner-McGrievy G, Green AA, Ferdowsian H.

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Although therapeutic diets are critical to diabetes management, their acceptability to patients is largely unstudied.
    OBJECTIVE: To quantify adherence and acceptability for two types of diets for diabetes.
    DESIGN: Controlled trial conducted between 2004 and 2006. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Individuals with type 2 diabetes (n=99) at a community-based research facility. Participants were randomly assigned to a diet following 2003 American Diabetes Association guidelines or a low-fat, vegan diet for 74 weeks.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Attrition, adherence, dietary behavior, diet acceptability, and cravings.
    STATISTICAL ANALYSES: For nutrient intake and questionnaire scores, t tests determined between-group differences. For diet-acceptability measures, the related samples Wilcoxon sum rank test assessed within-group changes; the independent samples Mann-Whitney U test compared the diet groups. Changes in reported symptoms among the groups was compared using chi(2) for independent samples.
    RESULTS: All participants completed the initial 22 weeks; 90% (45/50) of American Diabetes Association guidelines diet group and 86% (42/49) of the vegan diet group participants completed 74 weeks. Fat and cholesterol intake fell more and carbohydrate and fiber intake increased more in the vegan group. At 22 weeks, group-specific diet adherence criteria were met by 44% (22/50) of members of the American Diabetes Association diet group and 67% (33/49) of vegan-group participants (P=0.019); the American Diabetes Association guidelines diet group reported a greater increase in dietary restraint; this difference was not significant at 74 weeks. Both groups reported reduced hunger and reduced disinhibition. Questionnaire responses rated both diets as satisfactory, with no significant differences between groups, except for ease of preparation, for which the 22-week ratings marginally favored the American Diabetes Association guideline group. Cravings for fatty foods diminished more in the vegan group at 22 weeks, with no significant difference at 74 weeks.
    CONCLUSIONS: Despite its greater influence on macronutrient intake, a low-fat, vegan diet has an acceptability similar to that of a more conventional diabetes diet. Acceptability appears to be no barrier to its use in medical nutrition therapy.
    A pesar de su mayor relación con la ingesta de macronutrientes, una dieta vegana baja en calorías tiene una aceptabilidad similar a él de una dieta de diabetes más convencional. La aceptabilidad no aparece ser ninguna barrera para su empleo en la terapia de nutrición médica.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19167953

    Diabetes Care. 2006 Aug;29(8):1777-83.
    A low-fat vegan diet improves glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in a randomized clinical trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
    Barnard ND, Cohen J, Jenkins DJ, Turner-McGrievy G, Gloede L, Jaster B, Seidl K, Green AA, Talpers S.

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate whether a low-fat vegan diet improves glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals with type 2 diabetes (n = 99) were randomly assigned to a low-fat vegan diet (n = 49) or a diet following the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines (n = 50). Participants were evaluated at baseline and 22 weeks.
    RESULTS: Forty-three percent (21 of 49) of the vegan group and 26% (13 of 50) of the ADA group participants reduced diabetes medications. Including all participants, HbA(1c) (A1C) decreased 0.96 percentage points in the vegan group and 0.56 points in the ADA group (P = 0.089). Excluding those who changed medications, A1C fell 1.23 points in the vegan group compared with 0.38 points in the ADA group (P = 0.01). Body weight decreased 6.5 kg in the vegan group and 3.1 kg in the ADA group (P < 0.001). Body weight change correlated with A1C change (r = 0.51, n = 57, P < 0.0001). Among those who did not change lipid-lowering medications, LDL cholesterol fell 21.2% in the vegan group and 10.7% in the ADA group (P = 0.02). After adjustment for baseline values, urinary albumin reductions were greater in the vegan group (15.9 mg/24 h) than in the ADA group (10.9 mg/24 h) (P = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: Both a low-fat vegan diet and a diet based on ADA guidelines improved glycemic and lipid control in type 2 diabetic patients. These improvements were greater with a low-fat vegan diet.
    Tanto una dieta vegana de pocas calorías como una dieta basada en las directrices de ADA mejoraron glycemic y el control de lípido en pacientes diabéticos tipo 2. Estas mejoras eran mayores con una dieta vegana de pocas calorías.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16873779

  2. #2
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de JustVegetal
    Fecha de ingreso
    agosto-2009
    Ubicación
    En Cantabria.
    Mensajes
    9.689
    Gracias Sujal!
    Aunque está en inglés, hay traductores, la información es muy interesante.
    Creo que es importante hacer hincapié en que en la dieta vegana para asegurarse de que sea óptima para la salud en general y para la diabetes en este caso, es importante no descompensarla con consumo de fritos, hidratos de carbono refinados, azúcares industriales añadidos, aditivos, y demás basuras que nos vende la industria.

  3. #3
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de ospasbar
    Fecha de ingreso
    junio-2006
    Ubicación
    Valencia
    Mensajes
    876
    Gracias, Sujal. Podría parecer bastante obvio, pero es buenoq ue estos estudios lo confirmen.
    Veggie Runner
    La primera tienda vegetariana de Valencia
    96 366 51 33

    www.gaiavegana.com

  4. #4
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de sujal
    Fecha de ingreso
    marzo-2006
    Ubicación
    Guadalajara
    Mensajes
    8.690
    HDSVegan abrió un hilo interesante:

    Menú Vegano para Personas con Diabetes

    Estos enlaces de Mad Doctor también pueden venir muy bien:

    Cita Iniciado por Mad doctor Ver mensaje
    Hombre siendo diabética de nada le ayuda volver a ingerir carne y grasas saturadas....debe cuidar los alimentos de alto índice glucémico, eso sí.

    Pero lo más recomendable sería precisamente, el paso al vegetarianismo.

    Los más recientes estudios sobre la diabetes muestran que una dieta rica en carbohidratos complejos (que se encuentran sólo en alimentos vegetales) y baja en grasas es la mejor prescripción dietética para controlar la diabetes. Puesto que los diabéticos están expuestos a un alto riesgo de enfermedad cardíaca, evitar la grasa y el colesterol es el objetivo más importante de la dieta diabética, y una dieta vegetariana es ideal. Aunque todos los diabéticos insulino-dependientes necesitan tomar insulina, las dietas basadas en vegetales pueden ayudar a reducir las necesidades de insulina.

    Aquí tienes info.

    Diabetes y Una Dieta Vegetariana

    Enfoque vegetariano para la diabetes

    La dieta vegetariana, nua ayuda contra la diabetes

    Contra la diabetes mejor una dieta vegetariana


    Si necesitáis más info, ya sabéis dónde estoy.
    Un artículo relacionado:
    Cita Iniciado por margaly Ver mensaje
    Dietas Vegetarianas podrían proteger contra la Obesidad y la Diabetes Tipo 2

    Salud por Jose Luis Pereyra
    Publicado 18 de Mayo de 2009


    Las dietas vegetarianas pueden proteger contra la obesidad y la diabetes tipo 2, según los resultados de un estudio de cohortes en el número de mayo de Diabetes Care.

    “El Futuro de Investigación encontró que el IMC [índice de masa corporal] más alto fue el de comedores de carne, menor en los vegetarianos y los comedores de pescado “, escribe Tonstad Serena, MD, PhD, de la Universidad de Loma Linda en Loma Linda, California, y colegas. “Los efectos protectores del vegetarianismo contra el exceso de peso pueden ser debido a la anulación de los principales grupos de alimentos, el desplazamiento de las calorías a los grupos de alimentos que son más saciadores, u otros factores. Basado en una revisión de los datos experimentales, los investigadores han sugerido que la cartera de los alimentos encontrados en las dietas vegetarianas puede llevar metabólicas ventajas para la prevención de la diabetes tipo 2. “

    El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la prevalencia de la diabetes tipo 2 en las personas después de los diferentes tipos de dietas vegetarianas en contra de que no vegetarianas, utilizando un estudio de cohorte de 22.434 hombres y 38.469 mujeres inscritas en el Estudio de Salud Adventista-2 llevó a cabo a partir de 2002 a 2006.

    Los adventistas del séptimo día los miembros de la iglesia en América del Norte siempre auto-reporte de estadísticas demográficas, antropométricas, historia médica, estilo de vida y datos, y un cuestionario de frecuencia de alimentos se utilizaron para clasificar el tipo de dieta vegetariana. Multivariado de regresión logística ajustado en función permite el cálculo de la odds ratio (OR) y el 95% de intervalo de confianza [IC].

    Los vegetarianos tuvieron el menor IMC (23,6 kg / m 2). Hubo un aumento progresivo en el IMC con el aumento de contenido de productos de origen animal en la dieta: 25,7 kg / m 2 en ovo-lacto-vegetarianos, 26,3 kg / m 2 en pesco-vegetarianos, 27,3 kg / m 2 en semi-vegetarianos, y de 28,8 kg / m 2 en no vegetarianos.

    La prevalencia de la diabetes tipo 2 también aumentó con el aumento del consumo de productos animales: el 2,9% para la dieta vegetarianas, el 3,2% de la dieta ovo-lacto-, el 4,8% de la dieta vegetariana-pesco, 6,1% para el semi-dieta vegetariana, y 7,6% para la dieta no vegetarianas

    En comparación con no vegetarianas, los vegetarianos tenían un menor riesgo de padecer diabetes tipo 2, después del ajuste para edad, sexo, etnia, educación, ingresos, actividad física, la televisión, hábitos de sueño, alcohol, y el IMC. El OR fue de 0,51 veganos (95% CI, 0,40 - 0,66), 0,54 para ovo-lacto-vegetarianos (95% CI, 0,49 a 0,60), 0,70 para pesco-vegetarianos (95% CI, 0,61 a 0,80), y 0,76 para semi-vegetarianos (95% CI, 0,65 - 0,90).

    Las limitaciones de este estudio incluyen la falta de datos sobre la carga glicémica de la dieta, los datos transversales, lo que impide un dibujo de inferencias causales; incapacidad para evaluar la actividad física durante aproximadamente una sexta parte de la cohorte; errores de medición de alimentos implicados en los cuestionarios de frecuencia; todas las variables auto-reporte, la posibilidad de que la diabetes puede haber estado en la sub-vegetarianos y otros vegetarianos debido a su menor BMIs, y no de cohorte representativa de la población en general.

    “El 5-unidad de diferencia entre el IMC vegetarianos y no vegetarianos indica el potencial de vegetarianismo para proteger contra la obesidad”, escriben los autores del estudio. “Aumento de la conformidad con las dietas vegetarianas protegidas contra los riesgos de la diabetes tipo 2 después de características de estilo de vida y el IMC se han tenido en cuenta. Dietas de pescado y semi- vegetarianas intermedio que ofrece protección”.

    Los Institutos Nacionales de Salud y la Escuela de Salud Pública, Universidad de Loma Linda, con el apoyo de este estudio. Los autores del estudio no han revelado las relaciones financieras.

    http://www.revistainfotigre.com.ar/2...abetes-tipo-2/
    Aclaraciones de Kalkoven en este hilo:

    Cita Iniciado por Kalkoven Ver mensaje
    Una cosa es tener diabetes (y entonces tienes que evitar los alimentos ricos en azúcar) y otra cosa es prevenirla. El hecho de que la diabetes se manifieste con niveles altos de glucosa en sangre hace pensar a mucha gente que son los alimentos ricos en azúcares los que la provocan, pero esto no es así: la empeoran si existe, pero no son la causa. En realidad, el consumo excesivo de grasa se relaciona mucho más con la patogenia (mecanismos que subyacen a la aparición de una enfermedad) que el de carbohidratos refinados o no. Estoy hablando en todo momento de la diabetes tipo II o diabetes del adulto. La tipo I es una enfermedad autoinmune en la que se destruyen las células del páncreas. La tipo II, la habitual, se produce básicamente por un aumento de la resistencia a la insulina, que en general guarda relación con la obesidad: un 80% de los diabéticos son obesos y muchos controlan la diabetes simplemente adelgazando (existen otros factores que intervienen el la patogenia, incluidos factores genéticos, que tienen un gran peso, y otros factores ambientales, de los que algunos probablemente estén aún por descubrir). Aquí se explica bastante bien:

    http://html.rincondelvago.com/diabetes-mellitus_6.html

    Las dietas veganas ricas en carbohidratos complejos tienen un enorme éxito en la normalización de las cifras de glucosa en sangre de los diabéticos tipo II y suelen disminuir en gran medida las necesidades de insulina en las diabetes tipo I aún a pesar de que éstas se deben a una destrucción autoinmune de las células del páncreas.

    De todas maneras, es como todo, tampoco conviene abusar de este tipo de alimentos por otros motivos: con 3-4 frutas al día hay suficiente y la miel mejor en pequeñas cantidades.
    Atención también a este hilo abierto por abbocath.
    Ejemplo de dieta vegana para diabéticos

  5. #5
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de sujal
    Fecha de ingreso
    marzo-2006
    Ubicación
    Guadalajara
    Mensajes
    8.690
    Algunos participantes del foro con diabetes:

    Cita Iniciado por saturnino Ver mensaje
    Muy buenas a todos.Tengo diebetis 2 por tanto no necesito insulina.Me gusta mucho la fruta y me dicen que no coma porque me subire la glucemia.Me podeis aclarar la relacion entre la ingesta de fruta y mi enfermedad.
    saludos
    satur
    Cita Iniciado por holly_golightly Ver mensaje
    Hola amigos vegetas!

    He estado desaparecida en combate, pero la cosa tiene cierta justificación. Me echaron del curro -ERE 20% plantilla de la tv-, tuve otro desengaño amoroso -nada extraño en mí, es la inercia- y ahora después de dos años yendo a médicos, resulta que por fin sé lo que me pasaba. Soy diabética tipo 2. Mi páncreas no se comunica bien con el intestino y me está hiperinsulinizando, con las consecuencias de ello: dolor de estómago, entumecimiento de brazos, pies hinchados, me salían cardenales por las piernas, migrañas de vez en cuando, temblores... pues eso. Que menos mal que lo han detectado y ahora tengo que ponerme a dieta de por vida, o mi páncreas básicamente petará y tendría que pincharme. El homeópata me ha dicho que menos mal que soy una persona qe se ha cuidado la alimentación y siempre con complementos, pues de lo contrario ahora tendría sobrepeso / obesidad y el colesterol por las nubes.
    Problema básico: no puedo abusar de hidratos de carbono, y como bien sabréis, es un pilar básico de la dieta de un vegetariano.
    Ahora como todo integral y con mucha moderación de pasta, pan y patatas. Nada de azúcar ni repostería industrial, y el alcohol muy lejos. Guay. Si ya no fumo, ni me puedo atiborrar a bollos, ni tengo trabajo, no puedo ahogar las penas en el alcohol, ni me como una rosca... ¿qué mierda de vida es esta?
    Llevo cinco días tomando homeopatía y haciendo dieta, y joder, a pesar de todo, me encuentro fenomenal. Ya no estoy cansada ni malhumorada, duermo bien...
    Lo estoy llevando con un homeópata porque paso de mi endocrino (tardó dos años en averiguar qué me ocurre, me hizo hasta las pruebas de leucemia, si será tontolhaba...). Lo único malo es que el homeópata me ha dicho que estaría bien que volviera a comer pescado -paso total-. Mi duda es... ¿si incremento mi consumo de algas a todos los días, los valores nutricionales se asemejarían a comer pescado?
    Gracias.
    Cita Iniciado por medussa Ver mensaje
    Hola!

    bueno, como forera habitual en muchos ambitos, no he podido resistir registrarme en vuestro foro tras leer algunos post y ver el ambiente tan bueno que hay.

    Soy Pamela, de Viladecans (Barcelona), tengo 26 años y soy, ante todo, animalista! Por ello, el ultimo paso (puede que uno de los mas complicados en ciertos aspectos) en esta filosofia de vida es el veganismo/vegetarianismo

    Al ser diabetica, comencé con dejar la carne roja hará unos meses (nunca me dio por contarlo, pero debe hacer como unos cinco meses) pero sin dejar del todo algunos "productos" de los que si queria, pero no me atrevia hasta que mi medico me diera el visto bueno"...Que ha sido esta tarde!!! XDD

    La verdad es que siempre le he tenido bastante panico a mi endocrino (¬¬) pero me ha dado el visto bueno con bastante buen rollo, aunque comenzando con el vegetarianismo...ya que los productos lacteos son una fuente bastante basica en los diabeticos. Asi que nada, se acabó la carne para siempre a partir de hoy, algo que esperaba desde hace ya tiempo. Y al ser paciente cronico, y ser habitual en mi centro medico por los controles, mi endocrino me ha agregado a mis analisis rutinarios el del hierro y la B12, asi que estare controlada totalmente (para alivio de mi madre XDD que aun la estoy convenciendo de la falta de necesidad para el ser humano de la carne)

    Y con esto quiero decir que mi familia, pareja, amigos, me respetan pero no comparten aun mi punto de vista, asi que he encontrado la necesidad de conocer gente que si lo hace.

    Gracias a todos, por aqui andaré!!
    Y gracias especiales a VeG por la bienvenida
    Cita Iniciado por leo y zoe Ver mensaje
    Hola a todos soy la mama de Aniel, me llamo Ruth y soy diabetica de tipo 1.
    En casa mi madre y yo, nos hicimos vegetarianas cuando mi hija , Aniel, nos hablo de earthlings, con los meses me he pasado al veganismo y esto me esta ayudando con la diabetes y a sentirme mejor.
    Estoy muy contenta de unirme a vuetra comunidad y espero aprender muchas cosas.
    Un saludo a todos.
    Cita Iniciado por JaviGS Ver mensaje
    Hola a todos, como ya he puesto en el título, soy Diabético tipo I desde los 14 años (tengo 29), y no soy vegetariano, aunque llevo una buena temporada planteándome cambiar mi alimentación, he ido reduciendo el consumo de carne poco a poco, sigo comiendo pescado, huevos de vez en cuando y algún lácteo.

    Actualmente estoy recopilando información sobre lo que supone poner en práctica una dieta libre de alimentos animales, las carencias que podría tener y lo que más me preocupa, los efectos sobre mis pautas de insulina y actividad física, pues me pongo dos tipos de insulina diferentes y practico deporte a un nivel medio-intenso 3 o 4 veces por semana.

    Bueno no doy más la lata, en cuanto me decida del todo y elabore mis equivalencias calóricas os comentaré como me va, entre tanto, escucho todo tipo de consejos y sugerencias, un saludo a tod@s y gracias de antemano!

  6. #6
    Despegando Avatar de Frytz
    Fecha de ingreso
    diciembre-2006
    Ubicación
    Madrid, España
    Mensajes
    4.928
    Cuando me hice vegeta por allá en el siglo pasado, era muy joven y sin mucho conocimiento de nutrición básica, así que comía muchas harinas, hidratos, bollería, etc. Y me dio algún tipo de hipoglucemia, así que cuando comía algo muy dulce me dolía mucho la cabeza a la altura de la frente. deje de comer cosas dulces y azucares, apenas los pruebo, luego descubrí las maravillas que ofrece la stevia y que ayuda mucho a cierto tipo de diabetes. Recomiendo mucho la estevia

    Tienda de productos veganos (alimentación, embutidos, quesos, chocolates, helados, suplementos, cosmética, piensos para perros / gatos, productos eco-biológicos y mas

    C/Ave María, 34 (Lavapiés) Madrid - Tel.: 91 250 20 02
    www.planetavegano.com
    facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TiendaVegana.PlanetaVegano
    Instagram: @tienda_planetavegano
    Twitter: @Tiendavegana
    Google+: https://plus.google.com/+PlanetaVeganoMadrid

  7. #7
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de sujal
    Fecha de ingreso
    marzo-2006
    Ubicación
    Guadalajara
    Mensajes
    8.690
    2009 Nov;52(11):2277-87. Epub 2009 Aug 7.

    Meat consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.
    Aune D, Ursin G, Veierød MB.

    Abstract
    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diet is thought to play an important role in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have found positive associations between meat consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes, but the results have been inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies of meat consumption and type 2 diabetes risk. METHODS: We searched several databases for cohort studies on meat consumption and type 2 diabetes risk, up to December 2008. Summary relative risks were estimated by use of a random-effects model. RESULTS: We identified 12 cohort studies. The estimated summary RR and 95% confidence interval of type 2 diabetes comparing high vs low intake was 1.17 (95% CI 0.92-1.48) for total meat, 1.21 (95% CI 1.07-1.38) for red meat and 1.41 (95% CI 1.25-1.60) for processed meat. There was heterogeneity amongst the studies of total, red and processed meat which, to some degree, was explained by the study characteristics. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These results suggest that meat consumption increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, the possibility that residual confounding could explain this association cannot be excluded.
    Conclusión: Esos estudios sugieren que el consumo de carne incrementa el riesgo de diabetes tipo 2. Sin embargo, la posibilidad de que "residual cofounding" * podría explicar esta asociación no puede ser excluida

    *No lo entiendo.

  8. #8
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de sujal
    Fecha de ingreso
    marzo-2006
    Ubicación
    Guadalajara
    Mensajes
    8.690
    Este del 2004 parece muy interesante:

    2004 Nov;58(11):1443-61.

    Cereal grains, legumes and diabetes.
    Venn BJ, Mann JI.

    Abstract
    This review examines the evidence for the role of whole grain foods and legumes in the aetiology and management of diabetes. MedLine and SilverPlatter ('Nutrition' and 'Food Science FSTA') databases were searched to identify epidemiological and experimental studies relating to the effects of whole grain foods and legumes on indicators of carbohydrate metabolism. Epidemiological studies strongly support the suggestion that high intakes of whole grain foods protect against the development of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). People who consume approximately 3 servings per day of whole grain foods are less likely to develop T2DM than low consumers (<3 servings per week) with a risk reduction in the order of 20-30%. The role of legumes in the prevention of diabetes is less clear, possibly because of the relatively low intake of leguminous foods in the populations studied. However, legumes share several qualities with whole grains of potential benefit to glycaemic control including slow release carbohydrate and a high fibre content. A substantial increase in dietary intake of legumes as replacement food for more rapidly digested carbohydrate might therefore be expected to improve glycaemic control and thus reduce incident diabetes. This is consistent with the results of dietary intervention studies that have found improvements in glycaemic control after increasing the dietary intake of whole grain foods, legumes, vegetables and fruit. The benefit has been attributed to an increase in soluble fibre intake. However, prospective studies have found that soluble fibre intake is not associated with a lower incidence of T2DM. On the contrary, it is cereal fibre that is largely insoluble that is associated with a reduced risk of developing T2DM. Despite this, the addition of wheat bran to the diets of diabetic people has not improved indicators of glycaemic control. These apparently contradictory findings might be explained by metabolic studies that have indicated improvement in glucose handling is associated with the intact structure of food. For both grains and legumes, fine grinding disrupts cell structures and renders starch more readily accessible for digestion. The extent to which the intact structure of grains and legumes or the composition of foods in terms of dietary fibre and other constituents contribute to the beneficial effect remains to be quantified. Other mechanisms to help explain improvements in glycaemic control when consuming whole grains and legumes relate to cooking, type of starch, satiety and nutrient retention. Thus, there is strong evidence to suggest that eating a variety of whole grain foods and legumes is beneficial in the prevention and management of diabetes. This is compatible with advice from around the world that recommends consumption of a wide range of carbohydrate foods from cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits both for the general population and for people with diabetes.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15162131

    Este es del 2008 y llama la atención sobre componente genético para los grupos de población y variables intermedias que deben ser estudiadas (eso entiendo).

    Whole grain foods for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.
    Priebe MG, van Binsbergen JJ, de Vos R, Vonk RJ.

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Diet as one aspect of lifestyle is thought to be one of the modifiable risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Information is needed as to which components of the diet could be protective for this disease. OBJECTIVES: To asses the effects of whole-grain foods for the prevention of T2DM. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED. SELECTION CRITERIA: We selected cohort studies with a minimum duration of five years that assessed the association between intake of whole-grain foods or cereal fibre and incidence of T2DM. Randomised controlled trials lasting at least six weeks were selected that assessed the effect of a diet rich in whole-grain foods compared to a diet rich in refined grain foods on T2DM and its major risk factors. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently selected the studies, assessed study quality and extracted data. Data of studies were not pooled because of methodological diversity. MAIN RESULTS: One randomised controlled trial and eleven prospective cohort studies were identified. The randomised controlled trial, which was of low methodological quality, reported the change in insulin sensitivity in 12 obese hyperinsulinemic participants after six-week long interventions. Intake of whole grain foods resulted in a slight improvement of insulin sensitivity and no adverse effects. Patient satisfaction, health related quality of life, total mortality and morbidity was not reported. Four of the eleven cohort studies measured cereal fibre intake, three studies whole grain intake and two studies both. Two studies measured the change in whole grain food intake and one of them also change in cereal fibre intake. The incidence of T2DM was assessed in nine studies and changes in weight gain in two studies. The prospective studies consistently showed a reduced risk for high intake of whole grain foods (27% to 30%) or cereal fibre (28% to 37%) on the development of T2DM. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The evidence from only prospective cohort trials is considered to be too weak to be able to draw a definite conclusion about the preventive effect of whole grain foods on the development of T2DM. Properly designed long-term randomised controlled trials are needed. To facilitate this, further mechanistic research should focus on finding a set of relevant intermediate endpoints for T2DM and on identifying genetic subgroups of the population at risk that are most susceptible to dietary intervention.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18254091

    Otro, del 2010, de científicos griegos:

    2010 Spring;7(1):26-35. Epub 2010 May 10.

    The role of diet and lifestyle in primary, secondary, and tertiary diabetes prevention: a review of meta-analyses.
    Psaltopoulou T, Ilias I, Alevizaki M.

    Abstract
    Prevention of diabetes is crucial to lowering disease incidence, and thus minimizing the individual, familial, and public health burden. The purpose of this review is to gather current information from meta-analyses on dietary and lifestyle practices concerning reduction of risk to develop type 2 diabetes. Low glycemic index dietary patterns reduce both fasting blood glucose and glycated proteins independent of carbohydrate consumption. Diets rich in whole-grain, cereal high fiber products, and non-oil-seed pulses are beneficial. Whereas, frequent meat consumption has been shown to increase risk. Regarding non-alcoholic beverages, 4 cups/day of filtered coffee or tea are associated with a reduced diabetes risk. In contrast, the consumption of alcoholic beverages should not exceed 1-3 drinks/day. Intake of vitamin E, carotenoids, and magnesium can be increased to counteract diabetes risk. Obesity is the most important factor accounting for more than half of new diabetes' cases; even modest weight loss has a favorable effect in preventing the appearance of diabetes. Also, physical exercise with or without diet contributes to a healthier lifestyle, and is important for lowering risk. Finally, there is a positive association between smoking and risk to develop type 2 diabetes. As far as secondary and tertiary prevention is concerned, for persons already diagnosed with diabetes, there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of diet or lifestyle modification on glycemic control, but further studies are necessary.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20703436

  9. #9
    Usuari@ expert@ Avatar de sujal
    Fecha de ingreso
    marzo-2006
    Ubicación
    Guadalajara
    Mensajes
    8.690
    Low-calorie diet offers hope of cure for type 2 diabetes
    British study finds two-month extreme diet can cure type 2 diabetes and overturns assumptions about 'lifelong' condition

    Fuente aquí (pendiente de traducción)

    http://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/...pe-2-diabetes/

  10. #10
    Usuario SUPERexperto Avatar de sunwukung
    Fecha de ingreso
    mayo-2008
    Mensajes
    2.983

    "Iniciado por Kalkoven Ver Mensaje
    Una cosa es tener diabetes (y entonces tienes que evitar los alimentos ricos en azúcar) y otra cosa es prevenirla. El hecho de que la diabetes se manifieste con niveles altos de glucosa en sangre hace pensar a mucha gente que son los alimentos ricos en azúcares los que la provocan, pero esto no es así: la empeoran si existe, pero no son la causa. En realidad, el consumo excesivo de grasa se relaciona mucho más con la patogenia (mecanismos que subyacen a la aparición de una enfermedad) que el de carbohidratos refinados o no. Estoy hablando en todo momento de la diabetes tipo II o diabetes del adulto. La tipo I es una enfermedad autoinmune en la que se destruyen las células del páncreas. La tipo II, la habitual, se produce básicamente por un aumento de la resistencia a la insulina, que en general guarda relación con la obesidad: un 80% de los diabéticos son obesos y muchos controlan la diabetes simplemente adelgazando (existen otros factores que intervienen el la patogenia, incluidos factores genéticos, que tienen un gran peso, y otros factores ambientales, de los que algunos probablemente estén aún por descubrir). Aquí se explica bastante bien:

    http://html.rincondelvago.com/diabetes-mellitus_6.html

    Las dietas veganas ricas en carbohidratos complejos tienen un enorme éxito en la normalización de las cifras de glucosa en sangre de los diabéticos tipo II y suelen disminuir en gran medida las necesidades de insulina en las diabetes tipo I aún a pesar de que éstas se deben a una destrucción autoinmune de las células del páncreas.

    De todas maneras, es como todo, tampoco conviene abusar de este tipo de alimentos por otros motivos: con 3-4 frutas al día hay suficiente y la miel mejor en pequeñas cantidades."


    La clave es la cantidad de grasa, que bloquea los mecanismos de absorción en exceso, para todo tipo de enfermedades. Con la fruta no hay ningún problema, la miel es tan nociva como cualquier producto sin fibra.

 

 
Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo

Temas similares

  1. Respuestas: 9
    Último mensaje: 30-nov-2016, 14:20
  2. Veganismo y diabetes
    Por johniewalker en el foro Aún no soy vegetarian@...
    Respuestas: 21
    Último mensaje: 12-may-2016, 17:07
  3. Diabetes felina
    Por Lady_veg en el foro Mundo Animal
    Respuestas: 1
    Último mensaje: 09-ene-2016, 20:17
  4. Diabetes
    Por Ianthe en el foro Nutrición y Dietética
    Respuestas: 6
    Último mensaje: 05-dic-2009, 04:13
  5. Diabetes y fruta
    Por saturnino en el foro Aún no soy vegetarian@...
    Respuestas: 3
    Último mensaje: 05-mar-2009, 14:51

Permisos de publicación

  • No puedes crear nuevos temas
  • No puedes responder temas
  • No puedes subir archivos adjuntos
  • No puedes editar tus mensajes
  •